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WATER REPORT

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 The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also, come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

     Listed in the table below are the contaminants that were detected. In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions:

  • Non-Detects (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
  • Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
  • Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
  • Maximum Contaminant Level - The "Maximum Allowed" (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - The "Goal"(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
  • Treatment Technique (TT) – A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
  • Action Level (AL) – The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
  • Picocuries per liter (pCi/L)picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Goal (MRDLG)- The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

Contaminant

Violation
(Y/N)

Level
Detect
Low/High

Unit of
Measurement

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Alpha emitters – (pCi/L) Data results from

No

.3

PCi/L

0

15

Erosion of natural deposits

Nitrate

No

1

Ppm

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Fluoride

No

.10 to .11

Ppm

4

4

Water additive which promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Barium

No

.013

Ppm

2

2

Discharge of drilling waste; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Secondary Contaminants

 

 

 

 

RUL

 

Sodium

No

5.5 to 6.2

Ppm

n/a

50

Erosion of natural deposits

Sulfate

No

2.88 to 3.70

Ppm

n/a

250

Erosion of natural deposits

The following are the potential health effects on children, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and others of the found contaminants listed in the table above.

  • Alpha emitters - Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation. Some people who drink water containing these alpha emitters in excess of the MCL, 15 (pCi/L) over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
  • Barium – Some people who drink water containing barium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience an increase in their blood pressure.
  • Nitrate – Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL, 10 ppm could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.
  • Fluoride – Some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL 4 ppm over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Children may get mottled teeth.

Our system had no violations. We are proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State standards. We learned through our monitoring and testing that some contaminants were detected, however the EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at this level.

Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your municipality with clean, quality water this year.